Dr Joe's Blog

***SPAM*** Dental records identify WWII Soldier

More than 70 years later, an unknown soldier comes homePrinted by Dr. Joe Miskin at miskindental.ca The Canadian Press FacebookTwitterMoreWASHINGTON — Gerard Murphy never met his uncle Richard. But the Potomac, Maryland, native grew up hearing stories of the former journalist who enlisted in the Marines during World War II and disappeared during the June 15, 1944, amphibious assault on the Pacific island of Saipan."This was a mystery in our family for basically my entire life," said Gerard Murphy, a lawyer. "It's bad enough to lose someone in a war. Having them missing in action is an added burden and grief to carry."That all changed in 2015, when Gerard Murphy was contacted by Ted Darcy, an independent researcher specializing in identifying World War II-era military remains. Darcy, a retired Marine gunnery sergeant, believed he had made a match between Richard Murphy's dental records and the remains of an unidentified Saipan casualty buried in the Philippines as unknown soldier X-15.Three years and many steps later Richard Murphy's remains are finally coming home. Darcy's efforts resulted in the military disinterring the remains in the X-15 grave and bringing them to Hawaii for genetic testing. Gerard Murphy and one of his cousins provided DNA

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Dental equipment stolen from Vancouver Island charity

Dental equipment stolen from Vancouver Island charityPosted By:Dr. Joe Miskin of Miskin Dental Ajax and Kendall Hansonon: October 03, 2018In: CHEKNewsWATCH: The head of a Vancouver Island charity is appealing for help after thieves stole some expensive dental equipment. It happened this past weekend in Nanaimo. The charity provides dental care to remote parts of Vancouver Island and the theft comes less than two weeks before the equipment was going to be used during an upcoming trip. Kendall Hanson reports.She normally works in Nanaimo but each year, as part of the charity she founded, she also goes to remote parts of Vancouver Island to help people who don’t have access to or can’t afford dental care.“And I take volunteers with me when I can so it’s a growing program that’s been really successful and really well received by the communities,” said Cooper, president of the Share A Smile Society. “They look forward to us coming every yearBut this fall’s trip was put in jeopardy.“At some point in time from 9 o’clock in the morning Saturday until when I discovered the loss on Sunday morning, it went missing,” said Cooper.Last weekend much of the charity’s dental equipment

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Texas prisons often deny dentures to inmates with no teeth

AP and Miskin Dental Ajax 905-686-4343HOUSTON — Inmates without teeth in Texas are routinely denied dentures because state prison policy says chewing isn’t a medical necessity because they can eat blended food.Texas prisons’ medical providers approved 71 dentures to a state inmate population of more than 149,000 in 2016, the Houston Chronicle reported. It’s a sharp decline from 15 years ago, when more than 1,000 dental prosthetics were approved.California, the next-largest prison population, has given nearly six times as many dentures as Texas in the past decade, despite the Lone Star State having nearly 19,000 more inmates than the Golden State. California’s prison system provided more than 4,800 dental prosthetics in 2016, according to the state’s Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation data.Many Texas inmates are in need because they’re elderly, have a history of drug use or came from impoverished backgrounds with subpar dental care.But state policy has strict guidelines saying that inmates can’t get dentures unless they’re underweight or suffering from other medical complications. The policy recommends that inmates with fewer than seven teeth undergo reviews for dentures, but there usually needs to be additional health issues to merit serious consideration for the few dental prosthetics doled out each

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***SPAM*** Watch your Mouth ...... from Truck Driver News

                                    August 28, 2018 by Karen Bowen amd Dr. Joe Miskin from miskindental.ca                Unless you constantly sing along with the radio while alone in your rig, your closed mouth creates an excellent environment for bacterial growth. Fortunately, although your mouth is teeming with bacteria, your body’s natural defenses partnered with good oral health care can keep them at acceptable levels. However, improper oral hygiene may lead to mouth infections, tooth decay, gum disease, and general poor health.Recent studies show that your oral health gives clues about your overall health and that mouth issues may also affect other parts of your body. These studies suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis (a severe form of gum disease) might increase your risk of developing some diseases, while other diseases, such as diabetes, may lower your body’s resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.You can circumvent these issues by regularly monitoring your oral health habits – keep your teeth clean to reduce cavities, gum disease, and other related conditions. Avoid tobacco usage; eat a healthy diet; floss; limit sweet snacks between meals; and, thoroughly brush your teeth at least twice daily with fluoride toothpaste.For

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All About Implants

From the offices of:Miskin Dental3 Harwood Ave SAjax, ON L1S 2C1(905) 686-4343drjoemiskin.com           andThe Academy of General Dentistry What Is a Dental Implant?A dental implant is an artificial tooth root that is surgically anchored into your jaw to hold a replacement tooth or bridge in place. The benefit of using implants is that they don't rely on neighbouring teeth for support and they are permanent and stable. Implants are a good solution to tooth loss because they look and feel like natural teeth. Implant material is made from different types of metallic and bone-like ceramic materials that are compatible with body tissue. There are different types of dental implants: the first is placed directly into the jaw bone, like natural tooth roots; the second is used when the jaw structure is limited, therefore, a custom-made metal framework fits directly on the existing bone. How do they work? Strategically placed, implants can now be used to support permanently cemented bridges, eliminating the need for a denture. The cost tends to be greater, but the implants and bridges more closely resemble real teeth. Can anyone receive dental implants? Talk with your dentist about whether you are an implant candidate. You must be in good health and have the

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