Dr Joe's Blog

Barrette forces Quebec's dental surgeons to remain in public plan

From Dr. Joe Miskin at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.CTV Montreal Published Thursday, July 26, 2018 10:21AM EDT Last Updated Friday, July 27, 2018 7:27AM EDTThe Quebec government will force dentists to stay in the public system after they threatened to leave and not provide free services to children under 10 and those who receive social assistance.This comes after a day of dueling between the two sides as dental surgeons followed through on threats Thursday morning, withdrawing from the public dental plan.The president of the Association of Dental Surgeons of Quebec, Serge Langlois, filed the paperwork at 10 a.m., notifying the province of the union’s plans. Langlois met with media afterwards, presenting written testimony from 2,000 dentists who said they were ready to leave the public system should a contract not be reached soon.PHOTOSDentist Works on TeethLanglois said the tactic is necessary to show their intense displeasure with the government's latest offer."Our patients understand the dentists in this situation," he said. "They know we work hard when we treat children."Quebec Health Minister Gaetan Barrette pushed back in the afternoon, saying it wasn’t going to happen.“We have the means to sign a decree at the government preventing that from happening, and the decree has already been signed,” he

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Triclosan in toothpaste and 2000 other consumer products may increase colon cancer

By Tony Edwards, DrBicuspid.com editor in chief and Dr. Joe Miskin, Ajax at Miskin DentalJune 8, 2018 -- The effects of triclosan on human health should be urgently re-examined, according to the authors of a new preclinical study that found the chemical might increase the risk of colon cancer and other harmful consequences.A low dose of triclosan exacerbated colitis-associated colon cancer and had other harmful effects in mice, according to researchers from the University of Massachusetts. They recommended that further research is needed to establish science-based policies for the regulation of this antimicrobial compound in consumer products. The study was published May 30 in Science Translational Medicine."These results, for the first time, suggest that triclosan could have adverse effects on gut health," senior author Guodong Zhang, PhD, said in a release from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Zhang is an assistant professor in the department of food science.Antimicrobial additiveTriclosan is used as an antimicrobial additive in more than 2,000 consumer products, such as toothpastes, cosmetics, clothes, kitchenware, and toys. Some toothpastes contain 3,000 parts per million (ppm) of the chemical, according to the researchers.Because of its ubiquity, exposure to triclosan is practically unavoidable in the U.S., but little is known about

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***SPAM*** Toothy squirrel saved

Toothy squirrel saved when Alberta rancher trims themBucky the squirrel had sprouted some bad teeth that threatened his survivalWallis Snowdon and drjoemiskin.comBucky's teeth had grown so long they curled out of his mouth and around his cheeks. (Jannet Talbott/Facebook)A toothy squirrel named Bucky is once again fattening up on nuts after an Alberta woman trimmed his tusks.When Jannet Lee Talbott spotted the critter on the backyard bird feeder at her Barrhead horse ranch earlier this week, she couldn't believe her eyes.The squirrel's teeth had grown so long they curled out of his mouth and around his cheeks. "I saw this squirrel with this huge tooth coming out his mouth and it curled right around and it was dangerously close to its eye," said Talbot,. "And I thought, 'Oh my gosh. That's not good. I'm going to trap this guy and get that tooth fixed for him.'"'He couldn't live much longer'Squirrels have four front teeth that grow continuously throughout their lives. The teeth wear down naturally from the constant gnawing on nuts and bark.But if the front incisors become damaged or uneven, the squirrel will struggle to keep them ground down and may develop huge fangs."He couldn't live much longer the way he was because

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{Category: Health) The fight against tooth decay gets help

By the University of Toronto and Dr. Joe Miskin in AjaxThe fight against tooth decay gets help with a new smart material from U of T researchers Professor Ben Hatton (MSE), Professor Yoav Finer (Dentistry) and PhD candidate Cameron Stewart (IBBME) (Photo Credit: Faculty of Dentistry Yodit Tedla) Professor Ben Hatton (MSE), Professor Yoav Finer (Dentistry) and PhD candidate Cameron Stewart (IBBME) (Photo Credit: Faculty of Dentistry Yodit Tedla) Professor Ben Hatton (MSE), Professor Yoav Finer (Dentistry) and PhD candidate Cameron Stewart (IBBME) (Photo Credit: Faculty of Dentistry Yodit Tedla) When patients go to the dentist to fill a cavity, they’re trying to solve a problem — not create a new one. But many dental patients get some bad news: bacteria can dig under their tooth-coloured fillings and cause new cavities, called recurrent caries. These recurrent caries affect 100 million patients every year and cost an additional US$34 billion to treat.Now, a research collaboration between the Department of Materials Science & Engineering (MSE), Faculty of Dentistry, and the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) at the University of Toronto has resulted in a novel way to minimize recurrent caries.In a recent paper published in the journal Scientific Reports,

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(Category: Health} Can Botox help patients stop grinding their teeth?

By Lori Roniger, DrBicuspid and Dr. Joe Miskin, Ajax DentistFebruary 1, 2018 -- Teeth grinding during sleep is fairly common, but dentists typically can't do much to help patients. Enter Botox, a neurotoxin that temporarily paralyzes muscles and is used to treat movement disorders and migraines. Researchers investigated whether this treatment could reduce the symptoms of sleep bruxismFor the pilot study, patients diagnosed with sleep bruxism randomly received injections of Botox or a placebo into the masseter and temporalis muscles. The investigators found that those who received the botulinum toxin injections were significantly more likely to experience improvements in sleep bruxism, and they published their findings in the journal Neurology (January 17, 2018)."Bite guards are commonly used and likely reduce tooth damage but probably do not reduce the actual contractions," lead study author William Ondo, MD, told DrBicuspid.com. "Botox likely reduces the underlying movement, regardless of what actually causes that movement, which still is not known in bruxism."Dr. Ondo is a professor of neurology at Houston Methodist Research Institute and Weill Cornell Medical School and director of the Movement Disorders Clinic at Methodist Neurological Institute in Houston.Weakening the musclesSleep bruxism is defined as jaw muscle movement combined with teeth grinding or clenching during

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