Dr Joe's Blog

***SPAM*** Watch your Mouth ...... from Truck Driver News

                                    August 28, 2018 by Karen Bowen amd Dr. Joe Miskin from miskindental.ca                Unless you constantly sing along with the radio while alone in your rig, your closed mouth creates an excellent environment for bacterial growth. Fortunately, although your mouth is teeming with bacteria, your body’s natural defenses partnered with good oral health care can keep them at acceptable levels. However, improper oral hygiene may lead to mouth infections, tooth decay, gum disease, and general poor health.Recent studies show that your oral health gives clues about your overall health and that mouth issues may also affect other parts of your body. These studies suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis (a severe form of gum disease) might increase your risk of developing some diseases, while other diseases, such as diabetes, may lower your body’s resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.You can circumvent these issues by regularly monitoring your oral health habits – keep your teeth clean to reduce cavities, gum disease, and other related conditions. Avoid tobacco usage; eat a healthy diet; floss; limit sweet snacks between meals; and, thoroughly brush your teeth at least twice daily with fluoride toothpaste.For

Read more
All About Implants

From the offices of:Miskin Dental3 Harwood Ave SAjax, ON L1S 2C1(905) 686-4343drjoemiskin.com           andThe Academy of General Dentistry What Is a Dental Implant?A dental implant is an artificial tooth root that is surgically anchored into your jaw to hold a replacement tooth or bridge in place. The benefit of using implants is that they don't rely on neighbouring teeth for support and they are permanent and stable. Implants are a good solution to tooth loss because they look and feel like natural teeth. Implant material is made from different types of metallic and bone-like ceramic materials that are compatible with body tissue. There are different types of dental implants: the first is placed directly into the jaw bone, like natural tooth roots; the second is used when the jaw structure is limited, therefore, a custom-made metal framework fits directly on the existing bone. How do they work? Strategically placed, implants can now be used to support permanently cemented bridges, eliminating the need for a denture. The cost tends to be greater, but the implants and bridges more closely resemble real teeth. Can anyone receive dental implants? Talk with your dentist about whether you are an implant candidate. You must be in good health and have the

Read more
Can a high-tech toothbrush improve teens' oral health?

By Lori Roniger, DrBicuspid.com andDr. Joe MIskin,   Drjoemiskin.com  Ajax, 905-686-4343    August 20, 2018 -- How can you get adolescents to brush longer and more effectively? Using an interactive power toothbrush connected to a smartphone could improve oral health habits and reduce plaque levels in this finicky population, according to a new study.Researchers compared plaque levels in adolescents instructed to brush as usual, with additional time in areas needing more care, using either a manual or an interactive power toothbrush that connects to a smartphone. They found that plaque levels dropped and brushing time increased with the use of an interactive power toothbrush compared with a manual toothbrush."An interactive power toothbrush with Bluetooth technology appears to appeal to technology-savvy adolescents, producing increases in brushing efficacy, duration, and compliance among this vulnerable population," Maintaining their interestMany adolescents don't follow toothbrushing recommendations, previous studies have found. Additionally, this demographic may experience higher levels of plaque formation due to their consumption of carbohydrate-dense snacks and sugar-containing drinks, as well as the difficulty of removing plaque when undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment.Since power toothbrushes have demonstrated better plaque removal than manual toothbrushes, the current study examined whether brushing with an interactive power toothbrush with Bluetooth connectivity

Read more
***SPAM*** Rise of fluoride-free toothpaste has dentists concerned

Jeff Donn, The Associated Press Published Tuesday, August 7, 2018 9:30AM EDT Last Updated Tuesday, August 7, 2018 1:38PM EDT - By drjoemiskin.com Ajax, OntarioDental health experts worry that more people are using toothpaste that skips the most important ingredient -- fluoride -- and leaves them at a greater risk of cavities.Most toothpastes already contain fluoride. While health authorities recognize fluoride as a cavity blocker, the internet is dotted with claims, often from "natural" toothpaste marketers and alternative medicine advocates, that fluoride-free toothpaste also prevents cavities.Dental authorities disagree.That view was underscored this week by an article in the dental journal Gerodontology that reviewed the scientific literature on cavities. Its primary conclusion is that, without fluoride, oral hygiene efforts have "no impact" on cavity rates.The idea that just brushing teeth doesn't stop cavities has largely been accepted among individual researchers for decades, but not always by the public. Dentists generally recommend fluoride for cavity fighting, but even some of them continue to believe that the mechanics of wiping your teeth clean of plaque also reduces cavities. The review findings, published Monday, gave pause to at least one dentist."It violates certain principles we've been taught and that we teach and that we believe," said

Read more
Province quickly reverses course on children's dental cleanings

Province quickly reverses course on children's dental cleaningsEarlier this month, the province of Nova Scotia said it would remove coverage for 'minor scaling'Shaina Luck · CBC News · Dr. Joe Miskin Ajax, ON drjoemiskin.comPosted: Jul 26, 2018 12:57 PM AT | Last Updated: July 2Premier Stephen McNeil said Thursday the government will reverse a decision on MSI coverage for scaling for children under 15. (Craig Paisley/CBC)The Nova Scotia government has quickly reversed a decision earlier this month that removed a type of dental cleaning coverage from thousands of families with young children. On July 12, the Department of Health and Wellness sent out an update to dentists saying it was immediately removing MSI coverage for "minor scaling" and polishing for children under the age of 15.Scaling is done to scrape off plaque and tartar containing bacteria that is harmful to gums. Premier Stephen McNeil said Thursday he was unaware of the update on scaling until that morning. He blamed bureaucrats and said the decision will be reversed."They were attempting to make a clarification on a policy, that if you look across the country no other place was covering this as well. But that's not their decision. That's a decision for government, and that's a decision that comes to my

Read more