Dr Joe's Blog

Reduced Dental for Children in Nova Scotia starts at the end of January

  Changes to children’s dental program could be ready for early 2019N.S. Health Minister Randy Delorey says people shouldn't fear reduced services Michael Gorman · CBC News · Posted: Nov 21, 2018 4:47 PM AT | Last Updated: November 22 by Dr. Joe Miskin of Miskin Dental in Ajax 905-686-4343. MiskinDental.ca  /var/folders/n5/4jpfr18n5314s1p50ssmq6ch0000gn/T/com.microsoft.Word/WebArchiveCopyPasteTempFiles/randy-delorey.jpgHealth Minister Randy Delorey says pending changes to the children's oral health program will not lead to reduced services. (CBC)Changes are expected to Nova Scotia's oral health program for children by the end of January.Health Minister Randy Delorey said Wednesday proposed regulatory changes, reached following talks between his department and officials with the Nova Scotia Dental Association, will go to cabinet for approval before the end of 2018.Delorey wouldn't detail the changes, but said in an interview any concerns they will result in reduced coverage are unfounded."The changes that are coming forward are positive, incremental improvements to the program," he said Calls for program changesDentists in the province have called for changes to the program, which provides basic dental care for kids up to 14, for some time.As past governments sought to expand care to more age groups, the dental association cautioned the program wasn't being used in the most effective way.The group said services should be focused on those who need them the

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Calgary's drinking water

CTV October 27, 2018 6:33PM MDT Updated Sunday Oct 28, 2018 by Dr. Joe Miskin, Miskindental.caDozens of concerned Calgarians gathered on Saturday afternoon for a discussion about the pros and cons of adding fluoride back into the city’s water system.The city stopped the practice of adding fluoride to drinking water back in 2011 because the government stated that any advantage fluoridated water has would be negligible because of the widespread use of toothpaste and mouthwash.However, opponents to the idea of taking fluoride out of drinking water say that it’s put many lower income Calgarians and children at risk of tooth decay.Wendy Street-Wadey, a general dentist, said that they wanted to hold a public forum to help spread awareness about some of the benefits of fluoridation that have now been lost.“We asked the people we thought who are experts in the medical field to talk about their area of specialty to read the literature and come to their expert conclusion as to whether community water fluoridation was safe and effective.”She says that it’s important to have fluoride in water because many health organizations support the measure.“Presently we do have naturally occurring fluoride in our water in Calgary, it fluctuates between 0.1

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Texas prisons often deny dentures to inmates with no teeth

AP and Miskin Dental Ajax 905-686-4343HOUSTON — Inmates without teeth in Texas are routinely denied dentures because state prison policy says chewing isn’t a medical necessity because they can eat blended food.Texas prisons’ medical providers approved 71 dentures to a state inmate population of more than 149,000 in 2016, the Houston Chronicle reported. It’s a sharp decline from 15 years ago, when more than 1,000 dental prosthetics were approved.California, the next-largest prison population, has given nearly six times as many dentures as Texas in the past decade, despite the Lone Star State having nearly 19,000 more inmates than the Golden State. California’s prison system provided more than 4,800 dental prosthetics in 2016, according to the state’s Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation data.Many Texas inmates are in need because they’re elderly, have a history of drug use or came from impoverished backgrounds with subpar dental care.But state policy has strict guidelines saying that inmates can’t get dentures unless they’re underweight or suffering from other medical complications. The policy recommends that inmates with fewer than seven teeth undergo reviews for dentures, but there usually needs to be additional health issues to merit serious consideration for the few dental prosthetics doled out each

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***SPAM*** Watch your Mouth ...... from Truck Driver News

                                    August 28, 2018 by Karen Bowen amd Dr. Joe Miskin from miskindental.ca                Unless you constantly sing along with the radio while alone in your rig, your closed mouth creates an excellent environment for bacterial growth. Fortunately, although your mouth is teeming with bacteria, your body’s natural defenses partnered with good oral health care can keep them at acceptable levels. However, improper oral hygiene may lead to mouth infections, tooth decay, gum disease, and general poor health.Recent studies show that your oral health gives clues about your overall health and that mouth issues may also affect other parts of your body. These studies suggest that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis (a severe form of gum disease) might increase your risk of developing some diseases, while other diseases, such as diabetes, may lower your body’s resistance to infection, making oral health problems more severe.You can circumvent these issues by regularly monitoring your oral health habits – keep your teeth clean to reduce cavities, gum disease, and other related conditions. Avoid tobacco usage; eat a healthy diet; floss; limit sweet snacks between meals; and, thoroughly brush your teeth at least twice daily with fluoride toothpaste.For

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Can a high-tech toothbrush improve teens' oral health?

By Lori Roniger, DrBicuspid.com andDr. Joe MIskin,   Drjoemiskin.com  Ajax, 905-686-4343    August 20, 2018 -- How can you get adolescents to brush longer and more effectively? Using an interactive power toothbrush connected to a smartphone could improve oral health habits and reduce plaque levels in this finicky population, according to a new study.Researchers compared plaque levels in adolescents instructed to brush as usual, with additional time in areas needing more care, using either a manual or an interactive power toothbrush that connects to a smartphone. They found that plaque levels dropped and brushing time increased with the use of an interactive power toothbrush compared with a manual toothbrush."An interactive power toothbrush with Bluetooth technology appears to appeal to technology-savvy adolescents, producing increases in brushing efficacy, duration, and compliance among this vulnerable population," Maintaining their interestMany adolescents don't follow toothbrushing recommendations, previous studies have found. Additionally, this demographic may experience higher levels of plaque formation due to their consumption of carbohydrate-dense snacks and sugar-containing drinks, as well as the difficulty of removing plaque when undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment.Since power toothbrushes have demonstrated better plaque removal than manual toothbrushes, the current study examined whether brushing with an interactive power toothbrush with Bluetooth connectivity

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